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Saturday September 25

  • 11:00 am

    Pacific Heights Mansions

    Old money heirs share fences with newly minted tech billionaires in Pacific Heights, arguably one of San Francisco’s toniest and most exclusive neighborhoods. Atop a hill with majestic views, the area’s towering mansions were a manifestation of of Victorian excess and a key part of the Gold Coast’s development. After the 1906 earthquake, homeless quake refugees provided the moneyed residents a different sort of neighbor. You’re as likely to run into a celebrity resident as a diplomat visiting one of the manses-turned-consultates.

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  • 1:00 pm

    Japanese Tea Garden

    After the successful 1894 Mid-Winter Exposition San Francisco decided to keep the Japanese Village exhibit. Makoto Hagiwara was hired to be the new manager of the Garden and immediately set about expanding the Garden three-fold to its size today. An impressive variety of flora greets you as you enter a Japanese inspired wonderland of small scenes created throughout the Garden. The peace and quiet of the Garden encourages one to slow down and be mindful of the surroundings - A perfect walk for those seeking a peaceful afternoon...

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  • 1:00 pm

    Presidio: From Military Base to National Park

    From Spain, to Mexico, to the United States — The Presidio has been home to more militaries than almost any other fortress in America.  When the military left lawmakers transformed the space into a National Park in 1996, and since then the Presidio has become one of the greatest (and greenest) places to explore in all of San Francisco. Join us on a walk through San Francisco’s panoramic, luscious park, with wooded areas and scenic views as far as the eye can see.

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  • 2:00 pm

    1906: Earthquake And Fire

    You are jolted awake in the morning of April 18, 1906 to a horrific scene. The San Andreas Fault has unleashed a shockwave felt from Los Angeles to Oregon, with the epicenter just off the coast of San Francisco. As the ground convulses, buildings disintegrate and fires are ignited. Your home, the capital of the West Coast, has been reduced to rubble in minutes: 28,000 buildings destroyed, 3,000 dead and more than 200,000 homeless. What followed that disaster, though, was one of the greatest stories of resilience in history

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  • 2:00 pm

    Land's End: Sutro Heights

    Across the West Coast, there’s few ocean vistas more arresting than Land’s End — a fact millionaire Adolph Sutro was well aware of when he built the first passenger steam train to the park in 1880.  He wasn’t done there: Sutro transformed the land, adding an elaborate public garden, renovating the quaint Cliff House and constructing the Sutro Baths, a massive swimming facility on the oceanfront. Come experience Adolph Sutro’s gift to San Franciscans

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  • 3:00 pm

    Telegraph Hill Stairway Hike

    Even for an eccentric city like San Francisco, Lillie Coit was an anomaly in the 1920s: a wealthy socialite known for smoking cigars, wearing trousers, and gambling like crazy (often dressed as a man to bypass the establishments’ restrictions on women). When she died in 1929, her passion for San Francisco lived on, devoting more than a third of her fortune to beautifying the city she loved.

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