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All Tours

  • 1850's San Francisco: Paris Du Pacifique

    Pendant cette visite, nous marcherons au cœur de la Ruée vers l'Or de San Francisco et découvrirons l'histoire de quelques uns des milliers de Français qui ont influencé la ville avec leurs restaurants, boulangeries, des magasins, blanchisseries, banques et bordels. Depuis la ruée vers l'or, San Francisco est toujours surnommée : le "Paris du Pacifique !"

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  • 1850's San Francisco: Paris Of The Pacific

    Everyone in France heard the rumors. Or saw the news reports "of gold mines...fabulous riches awaiting only the hands of miners to be picked up." Some packed their bags and set off for California. These French left their mark on the culture of the booming city. The French influenced society, especially in food and fashion. Without them, it's hard to imagine San Francisco becoming our sophisticated, cosmopolitan metropolis.  

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  • 1906: Earthquake And Fire

    You are jolted awake in the morning of April 18, 1906 to a horrific scene. The San Andreas Fault has unleashed a shockwave felt from Los Angeles to Oregon, with the epicenter just off the coast of San Francisco. As the ground convulses, buildings disintegrate and fires are ignited. Your home, the capital of the West Coast, has been reduced to rubble in minutes: 28,000 buildings destroyed, 3,000 dead and more than 200,000 homeless. What followed that disaster, though, was one of the greatest stories of resilience in history

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  • 1906: Phoenix Rising

    Nothing has changed the course of San Francisco’s history like the 1906 earthquake. One of the deadliest quakes in American history, the 7.9 magnitude rupture (and resulting fires) destroyed more than 80% of San Francisco and left tens of thousands without a home. The greatest city in the West — denigrated to rubble and smoke.

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  • A Touch of Glass: Glass in San Francisco's Commercial Architecture

    Some of the best examples of modern San Franciscan architecture involve a commonly overlooked design element: glass. It wasn't always that way. Make do, plain-front buildings sprang up during the frenzied years of the Gold Rush and gingerbread-covered Victorians were built in the decades that followed. But in 1918 San Franciscans were awe struck when famed architect Willis Polk unveiled his elegant Hallidie Building. Glass-shrouded buildings have taken over the skyline ever since, from the sleek skin of Financial District skyscrapers to the ornate ceilings of a Union Square landmark.

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  • Architecture Downtown

    After the 1906 earthquake  San Francisco was back to square one. If it wanted to remain the major American city of the West, it wouldn’t just need to rebuild — it needed to transcend what had been done before.  Over the next century, luminous designers from Chicago and New York would bring their experiences working with new materials set at record heights to innovate the local blueprint. Architects like George Kelham, Willis Polk, William Pereira, and SOM would paint the skyline out of thin air.

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  • Art Deco Marina

    San Francisco neighborhoods constantly change but still retain much of the look and character of past decades. The Marina District is no exception. Largely developed in the 1920s and 1930s, a period that coincided with a popular design style now known as “Art Deco” which fused art and technology with a jazz age lifestyle. Deliberately intended to be modern the style was influenced by a wide variety of sources, which can be seen on many of the Marina’s apartments and commercial buildings, while surrounded by a residential district of “Mediterranean Revival” houses and flats.

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  • Billionaires' Row: Outer Broadway Architecture

    After the 1906 earthquake pummeled their Nob Hill enclaves, the wealthy titans of San Francisco became temporary nomads. With the landscape wiped clean, where in the city was the best place to put down roots? The best view of the Bay was located on the hills of Pacific Heights, where real estate was essentially up for grabs. They parked their old money in mammoth mansions and created one of the most expensive zip codes in the world.  

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  • City Hall and the Civic Center

    After the original City Hall perished in the 1906 earthquake, San Francisco had a chance to think bigger the second time around. Civic Center is a campus that houses some of the city’s most important governmental and cultural institutions. Minimal walking — but maximum awe.

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  • Cityscapes And Public Places

    The 1985 Downtown Plan was one of the most important piece of red tape in San Francisco history. With accelerating downtown development, city officials laid down some ground rules: If you’re going to build here, you’re going to have to pay a little extra to cover the necessary infrastructure improvements. Oh — and you have to devote a portion of your project to a publicly accessible open space. Thus, Privately-Owned Public Open Spaces (POPOS) were born.

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  • Corona Heights Stairways

    Explore the Corona Heights neighborhood, directly adjacent to the Castro.The tour visits the Corona Heights Hill, Buena Vista Park, Mount Olympus, and takes in some of the most spectacular views of San Francisco. You will learn about the history, architecture and the underlying geology of the neighborhood, and the people and events that shaped the hill. PLEASE NOTE: this tour includes several stairways, some steep hills and uneven ground. You should be reasonably fit to get the maximum enjoyment from this tour and sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended.

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  • Cow Hollow

    Perk up your Sunday morning with the bell ringing at the oldest Orthodox Christian parish in America. Spared destruction from the 1906 disaster, Cow Hollow contains structures from nearly every decade since the 1860s. This tour illustrates the transformation of the district from a rural suburb to a full-fledged city neighborhood.

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  • Deco Downtown

    Even though the Art Deco movement was a French creation, it found a dedicated American evangelist in San Francisco architect Timothy Pflueger. His designs, along with those of other architects, invoke the jazzy buoyancy of the Roaring 1920s and San Francisco’s thriving economy throughout the period. We’ll take a comprehensive tour of all the Art Deco masterpieces in San Francisco’s downtown. Soak up San Francisco of the 1920s through these elegant, timeless buildings.

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  • Diego Rivera Mural at the Stock Exchange Tower

    Normally closed to the public, on this tour you see Rivera's "Allegory of California" the artist's first US mural, a shimmering masterpiece portraying Calafia, the Spirit of California, embracing and protecting the many treasures of this vast state. This tour is by reservation only and limited to 25 people

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  • Dogpatch and Potrero Point

    No one knows for certain how it got the name Dogpatch — Once the home of iron works, shipyards and other heavy industry hear how contemporary development is transforming this area to a lively mixed use district. It’s a designated Historic District you simply can’t miss.

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  • Embarcadero Skyway

    How do you move a shoreline? That was the question faced by city planners as they attempted to transform Yerba Buena Cove from tidal flats into a bustling port and a growing city. The answer: a whole lot of work and a smorgasbord of odd materials, including sand and abandoned ships that were repurposed as buildings to meet a growing city’s desperate need. Join us and explore what is has become: an urban oasis along the bay.   We'll stop by many hidden treasures that litter the long shoreline walk.

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  • Fairmont Hotel

    Experience the hotel of presidents, dignitaries, king & queens , rock-stars and the rich and famous. Visit a beautiful hidden garden, listen for the Fairmont bees, and you will leave your heart in San Francisco at the breathtaking Fairmont Hotel. Stroll through this Italian Renaissance palazzo masterpiece. On our tour you gain exclusive access to several beautiful and surprising venues and rooms that are not always open to the public.   This tour is by reservation only

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  • Ferry Building

    For much of the early 20th century, nobody traversed the Bay without going through the Ferry Building. At its peak in the 1930s, it was the second-busiest travel hub in the world, shuttling more than 50,000 people both to and from San Francisco each day.  When the city built its famous bridges, ferry travel dropped dramatically, and the building suffered for decades. In the ‘90s  the Ferry Building transformed into a world-class food market focusing on local artisan creations. Today, it remains an iconic landmark of the waterfront (and a popular establishing shot for movies set in San Francisco).  Join us on a wondrous trip through the centerpiece of the shoreline.

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  • Financial District

    In the 60's and 70's San Francisco's Financial District rapidly sprouted upward Lofty buildings like the Transamerica Pyramid re imagined what San Francisco could look like — but to critics, it was horrible imposition on the skyline. Learn about the kingmakers and titans of the Financial District, and how they’ve dictated the trajectory of San Francisco history. We’ll follow the money — and learn some curious facts about the city’s skyscraper hotbed.

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  • Fisherman's Wharf: A Hidden History

    It may not look like it now, but underneath the sleek, commercial facade of today’s redeveloped Fisherman’s Wharf, hundreds of Italian immigrants built an entire industry on the backs of Dungeness crab. Not everything on this tour happens on the water. We'll look at Ghiradelli Square, once the factory of San Francisco's most beloved chocolatier. Passing the Hyde Street Cable Car Turnaround we  discuss San Francisco's cable cars and we'll explain the stories of many of the historic ships anchored at the Hyde Street Pier.  Discover a new side of the Wharf, featuring stories of the Bay that locals themselves don't know.

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  • Fort Mason Historic District

    Once known as the “Gateway to the Pacific,” Fort Mason has been the protector of a growing metropolis, a site where America’s massive military embarked for the fight against the Axis powers, a community for earthquake refugees, a home for artists and the playground of tech bros. Since it was constructed, Fort Mason has transformed along with San Francisco, each time remaking itself into a dynamic headquarters for a changing city. Today, visitors are more likely to visit for its use as a vibrant arts hub with performance spaces and galleries, or the regular food truck gatherings and farmers’ markets.

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  • Fort Mason To Aquatic Park

    There’s a small rocky outcrop jutting into the bay that has been a vital part of San Francisco’s history, from its very beginning right up to today. Bring your camera to capture stunning views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, the Bay Bridge, Aquatic Park and the Hyde Street Pier. You’ll see historic buildings, a hidden oasis, outsized art and the wild parrots of Telegraph Hill.

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  • Ghost Walk at City Hall

    Ghosts are no laughing matter at City Hall. Built on the grounds of a cemetery, San Francisco’s “People’s Palace” is also its number one destination for paranormal activity. We’ll explore stories of disinterred remains, assassinations and other ghostly lore, as well as actual experiences related by City Hall employees. Don’t believe it? Take a stroll through and hear for yourself. This tour is only offered one night in October.  Check schedule in September for date.  

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  • Gold Rush City

    "Gold! Gold from the American River!", shouted San Francisco businessman Sam Brannan, as he ran down Montgomery Street in May,1848, waving a jar filled with gold over his head, sparking the Gold Rush. As word spread rapidly around the world, the tiny village of San Francisco, tucked amidst massive sand dunes by the Bay, and frequented by grizzly bears and mountain lions, was transformed virtually overnight into a booming instant city.

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  • Golden Gate Bridge

    What more is there to say? It’s an international symbol of San Francisco, a mind-blowing feat of engineering, and one of the most-photographed places in the entire world. The iconic Golden Gate Bridge has captivated locals and tourists alike since it opened in 1937. It was the world’s longest and tallest suspension bridge at its opening, and almost a century later, remains one of the most impressive structures ever built by humans.

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  • Golden Gate Heights Stairways

    With so many hills to explore in San Francisco, Golden Gate Heights often gets overlooked. Nestled in between Twin Peaks and the Sunset District on the westernmost side of the peninsula, it’s a hidden treasure enjoyed by the few in the know.    Note: This is a mildly strenuous walk. Sturdy shoes are recommended. Tour will be canceled in case of rain

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  • Golden Gate Park: East End

    It was the 1860s, and everyone had heard about New York City’s Central Park — a spacious plot of green that contrasted sharply with the metallic landscape beyond. To recreate such a space in San Francisco, city officials looked west and by the turn of the century, Golden Gate Park had developed into an enormous playground for a recreation-starved city.  Breathe deep and enjoy a natural oasis on the Pacific.

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  • Golden Gate Park: West End

    At the western edge of Golden Gate Park, within sight of the Pacific Ocean, the towering Dutch Windmill welcomes walkers. Surrounded by the year-round beauty of the Queen Wilhelmina Garden, the mill bears witness to the struggles of Park Superintendents William Hammond Hall and John McLaren to transform the shifting sands of the Outside Lands into a verdant landscape.

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  • Historic Market Street: Path Of Gold

    When surveyor Jasper O’Farrell completed his 1847 proposal for Market Street, an abnormally wide boulevard cutting diagonally through the heart of the city, it wasn’t popular. Landowning pioneers accused him of “wanton disregard” for their rights.   But over time opinions changed.  Come and stroll the street that unites San Francisco. Learn how Market Street has evolved with the times, always remaining relevant. Hear epic tales born on the Path, from Gold Rush stories to cable cars, vintage street cars and the construction of BART.

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  • Inner Richmond: Part I

    The Richmond District is one of San Francisco’s largest neighborhoods, and one with a vibrant history. Once dismissively dubbed the “Outside Lands” due to its distance from the city center and vast sand dunes, the Richmond played a vital role in the development of San Francisco as a little village.  It gave way to rows of pretty 1890s Victorians buttressed by the open parkland of Golden Gate Park and the Presidio. Where cars rush by on Park Presidio Boulevard, the district once welcomed 1906 Earthquake refugees and there was a small triangular block of old cable cars remodeled into studio homes.

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  • Inner Richmond: Part II

    South of Geary Street was the Richmond's Wild Side:  there were squatters and robbers’ roosts in an area that became a race track. When the race track was graded and divided into blocks awaiting housing development, instead they became campsites for American soldiers on their way to the Spanish-American War. Soon rows of Fernando Nelson houses appeared. A decade later, newly paved streets with beautiful Craftsman houses were built. Visit the part of San Francisco where Wyatt Earp once lived and a new hospital offered America's first health maintenance organization.

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  • Inner Sunset: The Birth Of A Neighborhood

    The story of the Sunset District began with windswept dunes and coastal scrub. Originally deemed hopeless and uninhabitable, the Sunset became a popular destination after the 1906 earthquake leveled most of the city. Affordable real estate prices, coupled with the misleading “Sunset” moniker brought waves of residents. There’s a lot to love about the Inner Sunset: its proximity to some of San Francisco’s best parks, its charming small-town atmosphere and the fact you can walk just about anywhere you need to go.  Discover the lore of the Sunset.

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  • Japanese Tea Garden

    After the successful 1894 Mid-Winter Exposition San Francisco decided to keep the Japanese Village exhibit. Makoto Hagiwara was hired to be the new manager of the Garden and immediately set about expanding the Garden three-fold to its size today. An impressive variety of flora greets you as you enter a Japanese inspired wonderland of small scenes created throughout the Garden. The peace and quiet of the Garden encourages one to slow down and be mindful of the surroundings - A perfect walk for those seeking a peaceful afternoon...

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  • Japanese Tea Garden/Stow Lake/Strawberry Hill

    On the first Friday of every month join us for an extended walk starting with the complete Japanese Tea Garden tour and then taking you outside  to Stow Lake and to the top of Strawberry Hill. A total contrast from the neatness and quiet of the Garden. You'll visit an observatory destroyed by the earthquake of 1906,  and cap it off with a steep walk down through a rushing waterfall to the lake's shoreline -- wild nature at its best!  

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  • Land's End: Sutro Heights

    Across the West Coast, there’s few ocean vistas more arresting than Land’s End — a fact millionaire Adolph Sutro was well aware of when he built the first passenger steam train to the park in 1880.  He wasn’t done there: Sutro transformed the land, adding an elaborate public garden, renovating the quaint Cliff House and constructing the Sutro Baths, a massive swimming facility on the oceanfront. Come experience Adolph Sutro’s gift to San Franciscans

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  • Landmark Victorians Of Alamo Square

    While standing in Alamo Square park across from the iconic Painted Ladies, famously known as Post-card row, visitors will see the incredible views of the San Francisco skyline. Beyond the Painted ladies, this official Historic District Neighborhood is home to countless other examples of Victorian architecture; including, Italianate, San Francisco Stick and of course the elegant Queen Anne homes.  It’s a historic district that's more than meets the eye—come along on a journey through time.

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  • Main Library Tour

    It’s easy to admire the Main Library of San Francisco from afar, its stately rectangular body spanning an entire block. But it’s when you get inside that the real magic appears. A dramatic skylight crowns the soaring atrium, flooding every nook and cranny with natural light. The bridges above span the spacious lightwells, delivering readers to whatever book they’re searching for. Perfect for bookworms and non-readers alike.

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  • Mission Bay: Hidden Waters

    Before the Gold Rush, Mission Bay was a simple, shallow inlet whose main residents were ducks. Early filling of the bay enabled the development of San Francisco's largest railroad yard surrounded by a bustling industrial district. With the decline of rail traffic, this large valuable section of land became one of the city’s largest construction projects.  Even though the “bay” has mostly disappeared, the future of Mission Bay looks bright and beautiful — see the magic for yourself.

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  • Mission Dolores Neighborhood

    See a mix of treasures in one of San Francisco’s most eclectic neighborhoods, starting at the famous golden fire hydrant where  locals successfully fought to save the area during the 1906 earthquake. Learn the history of gorgeous Dolores Park, when it was home to earthquake survivors and where today you will enjoy iconic views of the city’s skyline. Be dazzled by countless landmark Victorians, meander down the hip Valencia Street corridor, whet your appetite with sampling of murals, hear about a famous food corridor, and discover the city’s Spanish history at the oldest building in San Francisco, Mission Dolores, the church of Saint Francis of Assisi.

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  • Mt. Davidson Hike

    San Francisco has no shortage of tall structures with staggering views. But there’s something different about being on top of Mount Davidson — the air is fresher, the people are friendlier, and the view you’re enjoying was one earned through your own grit. Explore the colorful history of San Francisco’s highest hill as we stroll through a beautiful nature preserve up to the 938-foot tall summit. Note: Includes hilly trails which can be windy and muddy — wear a jacket and sturdy shoes. There will not be restrooms available on the stroll.

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  • Nob Hill

    Walk the streets where railroad barons, silver kings, and other wealthy San Franciscans built lavish mansions.  Hear stories of the success and scandals of the high society men and women who lived on Nob Hill, the place that locals call Snob Hill. Experience the splendor of a world famous hotel where Tony Bennett first sang "I left my Heart in San Francisco". Visit a cathedral whose stained-glass windows honor scientists as well as saints, whose memorial chapel displays sections of the AIDS quilt, and whose labyrinth is the site of both meditative walks and candlelit yoga classes.

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  • Noe Valley: A Village Within the City

    Noe Valley is a series of delightful surprises. Much of its story is tucked away within the confines of the neighborhood. Who was Noe? What is Horner’s Addition? Why do some people call it Stroller Valley? Who were the builders that created the charming homes that line the streets? Did Andrew Carnegie live here?  Sheltered from our famous San Francisco fogs by Twin Peaks, it has some of the best weather in The City. Learn how this area was transformed from a blue-collar stronghold into a delightful "Village within a City" -- Noe Valley.

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  • Old South Park

    In 1852 English entrepreneur George Gordon set upon creating South Park, the London-inspired planned community sitting just south of Market Street. Walk through one of George Gordon’s most personal projects and admire what’s left of the English-inspired oasis. Hear about the ups and downs, the fortune and romance, and ‘Second Street Cut’ that changed everything. It’s a taste of London you can’t find anywhere else this side of the Atlantic.

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  • Omni Hotel Walk

    Up for an adventure? Join us in the elegant Omni Hotel lobby for a surprise tour through the downtown area of San Francisco. Stops will vary — destinations could include Chinatown, Embarcadero Skyway or Gold Rush City.

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  • Pacific Heights Mansions

    Old money heirs share fences with newly minted tech billionaires in Pacific Heights, arguably one of San Francisco’s toniest and most exclusive neighborhoods. Atop a hill with majestic views, the area’s towering mansions were a manifestation of of Victorian excess and a key part of the Gold Coast’s development. After the 1906 earthquake, homeless quake refugees provided the moneyed residents a different sort of neighbor. You’re as likely to run into a celebrity resident as a diplomat visiting one of the manses-turned-consultates.

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  • Palace Of Fine Arts/Marina

    The 1915 Panama-Pacific Exhibition was a momentous occasion for the city of San Francisco. Only a decade removed from the most disastrous earthquake in the state’s history, city officials felt it was the perfect time to showcase what San Francisco had in store for the future. Architect Bernard Maybeck had a brilliant vision for its centerpiece structure: he wanted to invoke the imagery of Roman ruins, creating “a sense of sadness, modified by the feeling that beauty has a soothing influence.” Learn everything about the extravagant 1915 exhibition and the work that went into its preservation as we saunter through the Palace’s grounds.

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  • Potrero Hill

    It was the 1850s on the southern edge of town cattle peacefully grazed the hill know as Potrero Nuevo (“new pasture”). But bustling industry along the shoreline below the hill created a need for nearby housing. Hear how Potrero Hill was urbanized, industrialized, and then gentrified in the 1990s. Yet, today, some residents still feel like it’s a secret — isolated from the rest of the city, but blessed with sweeping views of the skyline and Bay.

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  • Presidio: From Military Base to National Park

    From Spain, to Mexico, to the United States — The Presidio has been home to more militaries than almost any other fortress in America.  When the military left lawmakers transformed the space into a National Park in 1996, and since then the Presidio has become one of the greatest (and greenest) places to explore in all of San Francisco. Join us on a walk through San Francisco’s panoramic, luscious park, with wooded areas and scenic views as far as the eye can see.

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  • Russian Hill Stairways

    Come along and climb hidden stairways 345 feet above the Bay. Walk through bucolic lanes, national historic districts and beautiful natural spaces. See where Willis Polk lived and worked, and discover a beautiful example of the Octagon House movement. It’s an architectural gem, supported by an extraordinary vista of San Francisco. Trust us — the view is always better at the top.

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  • Russian Hill: Architecture and Culture of an Island in the City

    Russian Hill is the rare neighborhood that feels both tucked-away and close-to-the-action at the same time. Hear about the Beats, bohemians, and general eccentrics who sculpted the area’s unique feel. Gaze at delightful mansions and cottages that remain distinctive even against the rest of San Francisco’s lovely buildings.

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  • Sigmund Stern Grove

    Most San Franciscans know Sigmund Stern Grove as a place for free concerts, pleasant walkways and its pristine Pine Lake. But if it weren’t for civic leader Rosalie Stern, it might’ve ended up just another residential neighborhood in the Sunset District. Come and walk this enchanting park, exploring beautiful meadows and a lake unlike anywhere else in the Bay. It is truly one of the most relaxing ways to spend a day in San Francisco. Notes: Meet the group at 19th Avenue and Sloat Blvd. If it rains, the tour will be canceled.

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  • South Beach and the South End Historic Warehouse District

    Before it became a chic, trendy place to spend a night out — South Beach was known as Steamboat Point, a vast home to boatyards, warehouses and plenty of fishing. Most notably, it was also the headquarters of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. The PMSC played a vital role in the development of the city: it was the first trans-Pacific service to provide a link between the US and Asia, jumpstarting the massive East-West trade that would dominate the century. Japanese immigrants boarded the steamers in droves. Chinese immigrants — many of whom would heroically construct the trans-continental railroad — joined them.

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  • South of Market (SOMA) Architecture Stroll

    Visit one of the greatest clusters of new buildings on the planet. Just as San Francisco quickly rebuilt itself following the 1906 earthquake, SF and tech companies teamed up to encourage the rapid transformation of South of Market after the financial downturn in 2008. SOMA became an architect’s dream: capital and demand were everywhere, and the district became an architectural gallery featuring soaring skyscrapers next to Beaux Arts and postmodern masterpieces.   We'll see how these buildings responded to both earthquake threats, and the stresses of rapid development on the community.

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  • Telegraph Hill Stairway Hike

    Even for an eccentric city like San Francisco, Lillie Coit was an anomaly in the 1920s: a wealthy socialite known for smoking cigars, wearing trousers, and gambling like crazy (often dressed as a man to bypass the establishments’ restrictions on women). When she died in 1929, her passion for San Francisco lived on, devoting more than a third of her fortune to beautifying the city she loved.

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  • Uncovering the Parkside

    As with almost all of western San Francisco, the story of the Parkside neighborhood begins with legendary entrepreneur Adolph Sutro. In 1905 a real estate syndicate purchased from his estate the land west of Sigmund Stern Grove determining it to be the perfect plot for a new project. Since then, it’s become the nature-lover’s alternative to the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. If you’re looking for a place to explore in San Francisco devoid of the sidewalk crowds, this is it.

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  • Victorian San Francisco

    Ever wondered why there are so many Victorian style houses in San Francisco with an endless variety of decoration? The answer lies in the rich and fascinating history launched primarily by the California Gold Rush in 1849 and the advent of the cable car.  Walkers learn cues to recognize the different styles of homes built across 4 decades.  If you are a fan of Victorian architecture, and don't mind walking a few steep hills, or just want to learn more, this tour is for you.

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  • Visitacion Valley Part I

    Put yourself into the shoes of an 18th century Franciscan friar for a moment — sailing into the San Francisco Bay, lost in the fog, not entirely sure where you’re going. Then, as the fog clears, you see a vast valley. You land, unload your things, and gaze upon the delicious vista of San Bruno Mountain and the Bay. What a wonderful place to get lost at sea.

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  • Visitacion Valley Part II

    Put yourself into the shoes of an 18th century Franciscan friar for a moment — sailing into the San Francisco Bay, lost in the fog, not entirely sure where you’re going. Then, as the fog clears, you see a vast valley. You land, unload your things, and gaze upon the delicious vista of San Bruno Mountain and the Bay. What a wonderful place to get lost at sea.

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  • West Side Whimsy Walk

    The state of city life in the late 1800s wasn’t great. The inherent problems of having a quarter of a million humans concentrated in an urban landscape weren’t being dealt with, leaving a mess for those who called it home. To the legendary architect Daniel Burnham, it was obvious that cities should be planned and designed with the public’s health and well-being in mind leading to the City Beautiful movement. We’ll walk through the Balboa Terrace, St. Francis Wood and Lakeside neighborhoods, admiring the detail and ornamentation that went into them. Get a dose of whimsical fun — supplemented by tales you won’t hear anywhere else.

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  • Westwood Park Bungalows

    In the late 1800s, the Arts & Crafts Movement emerged as a backlash to the Industrial Revolution and the frilly, lacy Victorian Era. The Arts & Crafts Movement stressed the beauty of nature and creativity of the individual craftsman. “Bungalows” were an offshoot of the movement, with their compact and efficient floor plans, making home ownership affordable for the middle class.

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